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Moscow Data Analysis Center Opens

The IRIS Consortium, the Institute of Physics of the Earth (IPE) of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, and the Scientific-Engineering Center (SEC) of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR announce the opening of the Moscow Data Analysis Center.

On February 8, 1991 the IRIS Consortium, the Institute of Physics of the Earth (IPE) of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, and the Scientific-Engineering Center (SEC) of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR agreed to develop a facility in Moscow to analyze and archive data from the US/USSR Joint Seismic Program.

The Data Analysis Center is located near the center of Moscow at 12Dimitrievskaya. The facilities of the Center are available without restriction to all scientists involved in the US/USSR Joint Seismic Program.

In addition to the Institute of Physics of the Earth, which is a signatory of the agreement, the US/USSR Joint Seismic Program currently involves scientists from the Institute of Dynamics of the Geosphere, the International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, the Academy of Sciences of Kirghiz SSR, the Armenian Academy of Sciences, the Yakutsk Science Center, World Data Center B, and other institutions. Seismologists from all of these organizations are invited to make full use of the Moscow Data Analysis Center.

Approximately 200 square meters of office space belonging to the Scientific-Engineering Center have been renovated to house the facility. IRIS has provided equipment for the Data Analysis Center, including three SUN 3 computer systems, a color workstation, a laserwriter, a scanner, a PC computer, a copy machine, a FAX, spare parts, and supplies.

Software, for the analysis of seismic data, is being contributed to the Center from several American universities. The Institute of Physics of the Earth, in turn, will be responsible for developing applications software and for the operations and maintenance of the computer facilities.

In addition to the new Moscow Data Analysis Center, the facilities of the US/USSR Joint Seismic Program include Global Seismic Network stations (marked with triangles), telemetered networks and arrays of seismic instruments (marked with yellow circles), and a Data Collection Center in Obninsk.

Data Available Through Center

In addition to providing advanced computer facilities for Soviet scientists, the Moscow Data Analysis Center will be the Soviet archive for all US and Soviet data from the US/USSR Joint Seismic Program. The Center will be connected to the IRIS Data Management System in the United States through a direct computer-to-computer link. By connecting to the IRIS Data Management System, Soviet scientists will have access to the full archive of IRIS seismic data.

The Data Analysis Center will include data sets from the facilities shown by the map on the previous page; specifically:

  • USSR Global Seismic Network (GSN) station data (open and closed triangles)
    Data from each of the GSN stations within the USSR will be available through the Center. The solid triangles indicate stations that are either operating or being installed. The open triangles represent sites of future stations.
  • Kirghiz Telemetered Network data (yellow circle around AAK triangle)
    At the request of the Soviet Union, a telemetered network of seismic stations is being installed in Kirghizia. Each of the ten stations will record high and low gain. 3-componcnt, broadband seismic data along with six low sample rate ancillary channels. The network will provide a comprehensive data set for one of the mosi earthquake prone areas in the Soviet Union.
  • Caucasus Network data (yellow circle around KIV triangle)
    A telemetered broad-band array and a regional array of portable instruments are being deployed in the Caucasus using both Soviet and US equipment. The datafrorr these arrays will allow scientists to study the seismicity, tectonics, and structure oi one of the world's few active continental collision zones.
  • Garni Dense Array data (yellow circle around GNl triangle)
    A portable, high-resolution array of 12 sites has been installed by the US Geological Survey in a 3-dimensional pattern in and around a tunnel al the Garni Observatory in Armenia. The Garni array data will allow seismic mapping and improved hazarc analysis for Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. Yerevan, with a population of 1.1 million, is an area of high earthquake risk.

The Data Analysis Center will also serve as the Soviet archive for data from stations outside the USSR and from joint experiments with the small aperture array, including the following:

  • US Network Day tapes
    Data from seismic stations within the United States are provided to the Soviet Unior as a part of the US Geological Survey network day tapes. The tapes, which are sen to World Data Center B in Moscow, include data from approximately 50 stations These data are in addition to the Global Seismic Network data available through the  IRIS Data Management System.
  • Data from US and USSR experiments with the small aperture array
    A portable 25-clement 3-component array has been developed for use by US ant USSR scientists. The small array, which was deployed in Pinyon Flat, Californi; in 1991, provides a capability to study in detail Earth structure and very lov magnitude seismicity. In 1992, the array will be deployed in the USSR.*
 
 
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